Artist China Adams' series A Certain Period of Time is now on display at Twentieth.

Artsy.net says "Her conceptual art practice is both rigorously analytical and politically incisive—but manifests in an intuitive, formalist elegance rooted in the body. And it’s very funny."

Read the full article here

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chinaadams2

chinaadams3

The Equipal Chair by Luteca and Laurent 09 lamp by Lambert & Fils studio were recently featured on Behance for their Seasons article.

Equipal Chair by Luteca

lambert et fils laurent

Catch Lambert & Fils at Paris Design Week with their Réflecteur window display. A reinterpreted staging of their Laurent collection.

reflecteur

Think Piece: Christopher Boots on the Healing Power of Minerals
Christopher Boots’s bronze folding screen shimmers with quartz and lapis lazuli

In his native Melbourne, industrial designer Christopher Boots grew up hunting rocks. His favorite find? Quartz. These days, hunks of the common crystal join a sprinkling of lapis lazuli in the Aussie’s first room divider. “I like to get my hands dirty,” says Boots, who cast the celestial screen in bronze using a lost-wax method to leave hand marks and a surface-of-the-moon texture on the limited edition of eight. Of his innate draw to minerals, the designer says: “I do believe in their healing power. We would probably improve as a species if we had more elements of nature in our interiors.” Available through Twentieth in Los Angeles.

Read the full article here


Christopher Boots, Vanity Screen, 2017
Lost wax bronze, clear quartz, smoky quartz & lapis lazuli
Edition of 8

Christopher Boots spectacular creation, Vanity Screen, is a project of love that has taken four years to realize. Presented at Collective Design in New York in May 2017, the room divider incorporates clear and smoky quartz crystal and lapis lazuli in contrast to a moon like surface cast in solid bronze. The celestial screen is the first in a limited edition of eight.

“In his native Melbourne, industrial designer Christopher Boots grew up hunting rocks. His favorite kind? Quartz. These days, hunks of the common crystal join a sprinkling of lapis lazuli in the Aussie's first room divider. 'I like to get my hands dirty,' says Boots, who cast the celestial screen in bronze using a lost-wax method to leave hand marks and a surface-of-the-moon texture on the limited edition of eight. Of his innate draw to minerals, the designer says: 'I do believe in their healing power. We would probably improve as a species if we had more elements of nature in our interiors.' " (Architectural Digest, September 2017)

Christopher Boots Studio produces a range of custom works both for clients and for design and process development. These pieces are intended to push the limits of the design process and explore materiality in order to advance the designer's craft and vision.

 

For more information please contact sales@twentieth.net

Stickbulb was recently featured in an article by The Editor At Large citing them as winners of this year's Best in Show at NYC x Design. Below is an excerpt from the publication:

"A light installation composed of redwood beams—carbon dating says they’re three centuries old—salvaged from a downtown Manhattan water tower has garnered much attention and taken home NYCxDESIGN’s Best In Show honor for the year. 'Ambassador,' a 16-foot-wide by 8-foot-tall installation by lighting brand Stickbulb in collaboration with RUX, radiated an arc of light over attendees at the Collective Design Fair, held at Skylight Clarkson Sq.

Nearly 150 beams were salvaged for the installation, which was designed to reflect the towering redwoods characterized in John Steinbeck’s book Travels With Charley. (In the classic, the author writes, 'The vainest, most slap-happy and irreverent of men, in the presence of redwoods, goes under a spell of wonder and respect.')

The NYXxDESIGN Awards, the second-annual competition from Interior Design magazine and ICFF, is designed to highlight top products and projects across New York’s month-long design fest. The Best in Show categories were originally intended to source the best of each anchor show (WantedDesign, Collective, ICFF) but this year folded the three categories into one, with Stickbulb honored as top dog across the three shows.

A panel including David Alhadeff of The Future Perfect, Emmanuel Plat of the Museum of Modern Art, Clodagh, Clive Wilkinson, Mark Zeff and other global and New York–centric design and architecture notables was tasked with choosing winners from this year’s selection of some 700-plus entrants, spanning two categories: product (wallcovering, lighting, furniture and more) and project (such as boutique hotel, health and wellness, and urban landscape).

Winning firm Stickbulb was founded five years ago by Yale School of Architecture graduates Russell Greenberg and Christopher Beardsley and has been rooted in the pair’s passion for architecture, modular systems and sustainable manufacturing. Stickbulb has worked with brands including Google, Facebook and Whole Foods, in addition to creating private commissions for hotels, offices and residences.

The brand’s LED fixtures are designed by RUX and made in New York, from reclaimed materials found locally via demolished buildings and sustainable forests. For the 'Ambassador' installation, Stickbulb sourced locally: As co-founders Greenberg and Beardsley tell EAL, 'The construction and dismantling of water towers in New York is scheduled and methodical and there is a market for the reclaimed wood, for sure. Following a lot of research and development, we’ve developed strong local relationships that allow us to get access to select material that is optimal for the fabrication of our products. A big part of our business and philosophy is sourcing beautiful reclaimed wood that has a meaningful and poetic history.' "

 

"The Most Epic New Furniture Collection We Spotted at ICFF

If you didn’t know that New York designer Anna Karlin had a background in set design, you might have guessed from this latest batch of photographs, showcasing the collection she just launched at ICFF in an appropriately brooding setting. Full of luxurious, sculptural pieces of lighting and furniture, the latest collection showcases Karlin’s interest in constantly tinkering with different mediums, as the pieces move from blown glass and carved marble works to larger endeavors like cast bronze, wooden and metal sculptures that hang suspended off a wall-mounted peg rack. In one of our favorite pieces, a sphere of Portuguese pink marble balances on a cube of brass-plated steel, smushed into a dimple of hand-blown glass; in another, a perfectly curving brass-plated steel chaise is lined with soft, cushioned bolsters — a form that in another life might be a pool chair, but here is the epitome of chic."

Read the full article here: http://www.sightunseen.com/2017/06/anna-karlin/




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