Culture

Lindsey Adelman with Branching Bubble Chandelier

Detail, glass barnacle with gold foil and brass stamen

Custom Branching Chandelier with rope

Detail, Porcelain and Leather Pendant

Branching Burst Chandelier

Small Knotty Bubbles Sconce

Custom Burst Chandelier, polished nickel

Fish Wing necklace

Branching Chandelier with custom powder-coat arms, brass hardware and porcelain shades

Stacking Bubble Chandelier

Shade models and natural inspiration at studio

Custom Knotty Bubbles Chandelier

Clamp Light installation

Lindsey Adelman with Branching Bubble Chandelier

A sculptural expression of movement and wit, Palindrome chandelier is a malleable fixture that can fulfill any spatial and aesthetic need. Its looping form, driven by a sequence of shaped steel arms and cast glass heads, can be read forward or backward (much like a palindromic number or word) and if desired, folds into itself with ease. This kinetic chandelier's sand-blasted lamps diffuse LED light in a soft, yet powerful manner and can be rotated to further enhance atmosphere. Custom powder coatings available.

Available here: RBW Palindrome at Twentieth

BUILT FROM SCRATCH Samuel Amoia and Fernando Mastrangelo of AMMA Studio combine industrial and household ingredients into works of singular beauty

In the Brooklyn workshop of AMMA Studio, ordinary materials await alchemical transformations. Piles of salt, ground coffee, and other commonplace substances are mixed with clear resin, which binds the grains before they're joined with cement and molded into strikingly beautiful furnishings. For founders Samuel Amoia and Fernando Mastrangelo, using such unconventional media, rather than wood or stone, is a way to bring something new to the table—figuratively and literally. "I look at furniture all day long, and it's always the same stuff, made with the same materials," says Amoia, who has his own eponymous interior design firm as well. Mastrangelo, an artist, adds, "Our idea was to do something totally fresh. If you buy a slab of marble, you already have something gorgeous. But if you start with the everyday and elevate it, you can achieve something intriguing, something special." A drum stool, for instance, fuses baby-blue cement with pink Himalayan salt, producing exquisite strata of color and texture. A rectilinear side table is composed of a spare cement shell with a luminous silica lining. And a large-scale faceted mirror features a frame encrusted with navy-blue glass crystals. Although the pair just launched AMMA Studio in May—offering both limited-edition and custom-made creations—they've already received a string of notable commissions, among them pieces for Soho House in London and Berlin and for DeLorenzo Gallery in New York. The design establishment, meanwhile, is buzzing. "I love the concept behind AMMA," says AD100 decorator Stephen Sills, for whom Amoia once worked. "Their furnishings have such an elegant, minimalist quality." The duo, for their part, are just enjoying the crossover between their independent professions. "It's sculptural furniture that can be viewed as art but is fully functional," emphasizes Amoia. As Mastrangelo notes of the pieces' often soluble origins, "even if you pour water on them, they're not going to melt." ammastudionyc.com -TIM MCKEOUGH

Laura Eckstein of Angeleno Magazine talks with Stefan Lawrence and Daniele Albright, designers of the Subtracted Cube

"Contemporary digital design technologies have a lot to offer, but the end result is often very techy-looking and unattractive, sometimes deliberately so.  We wanted to bring a minimalist sense of sculptural form and beauty, as well as natural materials and hand-fabrication, into the process," says Twentieth gallery owner Stefan Lawrence of Videre Licet, the newly launched furniture collection he collaborated on with artist and designer Daniele Albright.  Describing their work as "conceptual glamour," the duocreated five striking pieces for the locally made line that perfectly represent its provenance. ”Los Angeles is home to Hollywood glamour as well as 20th century minimalism,” says Albright. ”We combine inspiration from both into a mix that is rarely done, yet quintessentially LA.” The Subtracted Cube (shown here) represents one of the most basic design principles-the subtraction of form from a solid mass-in a luxurious yet seemingly simple fashion. But don't be fooled. ’’It’s nearly impossible to assemble metal with flat planes without distortion due to welding,” says Lawrence. "For this reason, the chair is made of folded brass with no welds at all, so its production entails a technical feat of craftsmanship.” Simply beautiful indeed.  Twentieth, 7470 Beverly Blvd., L.A., 323.904.1200, twentieth.net -Laura Eckstein

Subtracted Cube by Videre Licet

On June 27, 2014 at 4:00 p.m. as part of the Los Angeles Design Festival's Design Hooky, experience the newly designed Twentieth showroom with iconic LA architect Neil Denari of Neil M. Denari Architects (NMDA).

Limited capacity. Free, however RSVP is required.  

7470 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036

Tom Dixon

Next Thursday Tom Dixon comes to LA! RSVP to RSVP@twentieth.net by Feb 23.

Join us for a Q&A with Tom Dixon, a presentation and a book signing by the man himself. Help us celebrate the opening of our new gallery space along with @gardeshop and @artbook 7470 Beverly Blvd LA 90036 Hope to see you there!

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2