Culture

Several years ago Alexander Andersson. a third-generation furniture maker with a Swedish-Mexican hefitoge, bought a couple of benches in Mexico City, "I could tell by the way they were constructed that they were made by an architect—they were built like bridges," he remembers. Indeed, they were the work of Pedro Ramirez Vasquez a pioneedng architect who died in 2013. Andersson met with Vasguez's son, Xavier, who shared his father's archives, and thus began Luteca, Whose 20-piece collection is  made in Mexico City. In the 1970s it was very difficult to make metal cuts, which shows how visionary my father was" Xavier says. The architect's work is part of "Latin America in Construction: Architectare 1955-1980," an exhibition at New York's, Museum of Modern Ad through July 19.